Definition
Early rabbinic sources, from around 200 CE, mention several passages of Scripture in which the conclusion is inevitable that the ancient reading must have differed from that of the present text. The explanation of this phenomenon is given in the expression ("Scripture has used euphemistic language", i.e. to avoid anthropomorphism and anthropopathy). see www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masoretic_Text (Scribal emendations Tikkune Soferim) Wikipedia


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The question of the Masoretes changing the Tanach get's people excited. The idea that the text needs fixing (Hebrew Tikkune Soferim) enables the possibility for theology to be injected by the one doing the fixing. With that said, this page lists some of the changes that have been made. Here's a reference from Wikipedia (www.Wikipedia.org/wiki/Masoretic_Text).

Early rabbinic sources, from around 200 CE, mention several passages of Scripture in which the conclusion is inevitable that the ancient reading must have differed from that of the present text. The explanation of this phenomenon is given in the expression ("Scripture has used euphemistic language", i.e. to avoid anthropomorphism and anthropopathy).
Rabbi Simon ben Pazzi (3rd century) calls these readings "emendations of the Scribes" (tikkune Soferim; Midrash Genesis Rabbah xlix. 7), assuming that the Scribes actually made the changes. This view was adopted by the later Midrash and by the majority of Masoretes. In Masoretic works these changes are ascribed to Ezra; to Ezra and Nehemiah; to Ezra and the Soferim; or to Ezra, Nehemiah, Zechariah, Haggai, and Baruch. All these ascriptions mean one and the same thing: that the changes were assumed to have been made by the Men of the Great Synagogue.
The term tikkun Soferim (תקון סופרים) has been understood by different scholars in various ways. Some regard it as a correction of Biblical language authorized by the Soferim for homiletical purposes. Others take it to mean a mental change made by the original writers or redactors of Scripture; i.e. the latter shrank from putting in writing a thought which some of the readers might expect them to express.
The assumed emendations are of four general types:
  • • Removal of unseemly expressions used in reference to God; e.g., the substitution of ("to bless") for ("to curse") in certain passages.
  • • Safeguarding of the Tetragrammaton; e.g. substitution of "Elohim" for "YHVH" in some passages.
  • • Removal of application of the names of pagan gods, e.g. the change of the name "Ishbaal" to "Ishbosheth."
  • • Safeguarding the unity of divine worship at Jerusalem.
Tikkune Soferim Wikipedia.

The Wikipedia entry listed above for Tikkune Soferim is found under the broader entry Fixing the Text. This is mentioned because first it's a good read, and second because it's discusses the topics Suspended letters and dotted words (3.3) and Inverted letters (3.4 ) which are related to another verse list found in My Hebrew Bible called Jot's and Tittles.

Fixing the Text

  • 3.1 Scribal emendations – Tikkune Soferim
  • 3.2 Mikra and ittur
  • 3.3 Suspended letters and dotted words
  • 3.4 Inverted letters